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@inProceedings{LundholmFors-Kristina2019-284036,
	title        = {Reading and mild cognitive impairment},
	abstract     = {In the present study, we investigated the discriminatory power of eye-tracking features in distinguishing between individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). The eye movements of the study participants were recorded at two different time points, 18 months apart. Using a machine learning approach with leave-one-out cross-validation, we were able to discriminate between the groups with 73.6 AUC. However, somewhat surprisingly the classification was less successful using data from the second recording session, which might be attributed to the non-static nature of cognitive status. Still, the outcome suggests that eye-tracking measures can be exploited as useful markers of MCI.
},
	booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of Experimental Linguistics, 25-27 September 2019, Lisbon, Portugal / edited by Antonis Botinis},
	author       = {Lundholm Fors, Kristina and Antonsson, Malin and Kokkinakis, Dimitrios and Fraser, Kathleen},
	year         = {2019},
	ISBN         = {978-618-84585-0-5},
}

@inProceedings{Johansson-Sofie2019-284330,
	title        = {Lexical diversity and mild cognitive impairment},
	abstract     = {This paper explores the role that various lexical-based measures play for differentiating between individuals with mild forms of cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). Recent research underscores the importance of language and linguistic analysis as essential components that can contribute to a variety of sensitive cognitive measures for the identification of milder forms of cognitive
impairment. Subtle language changes serve as a sign that an individual’s cognitive functions have been impacted, potentially leading to early diagnosis. Our research aims to identify linguistic biomarkers that could distinguish between individuals with MCI and HC and also be useful in predicting MCI.},
	booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of Experimental Linguistics, 25-27 September 2019, Lisbon, Portugal / edited by Antonis Botinis},
	author       = {Johansson, Sofie and Lundholm Fors, Kristina and Antonsson, Malin and Kokkinakis, Dimitrios},
	year         = {2019},
	publisher    = {ExLing Society},
	address      = {Athens, Greece},
	ISBN         = {978-618-84585-0-5},
}

@inProceedings{Antonsson-Malin2019-284038,
	title        = {Discourse in Mild Cognitive Impairment },
	abstract     = {This paper reports on how persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) perform on two types of narrative tasks compared to a group of healthy controls (HC). The first task is a widely used picture description task and the other task is a more complex discourse task. Since the latter task puts higher demands on cognitive linguistic skills, as seen in previous research, we expected this task to be more efficient in discriminating between the two groups. The results confirm this hypothesis. 
},
	booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of Experimental Linguistics, 25-27 September 2019, Lisbon, Portugal / edited by Antonis Botinis},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Lundholm Fors, Kristina and Kokkinakis, Dimitrios},
	year         = {2019},
	publisher    = { ExLing Society},
	ISBN         = {978-618-84585-0-5},
}

@article{Antonsson-Malin2018-261788,
	title        = {Pre-operative language ability in patients with presumed low-grade glioma},
	abstract     = {In patients with low-grade glioma (LGG), language deficits are usually only found and investigated after surgery. Deficits may be present before surgery but to date, studies have yielded varying results regarding the extent of this problem and in what language domains deficits may occur. This study therefore aims to explore the language ability of patients who have recently received a presumptive diagnosis of low-grade glioma, and also to see whether they reported any changes in their language ability before receiving treatment. Twenty-three patients were tested using a comprehensive test battery that consisted of standard aphasia tests and tests of lexical retrieval and high-level language functions. The patients were also asked whether they had noticed any change in their use of language or ability to communicate. The test scores were compared to a matched reference group and to clinical norms. The presumed LGG group performed significantly worse than the reference group on two tests of lexical retrieval. Since five patients after surgery were discovered to have a high-grade glioma, a separate analysis excluding them were performed. These analyses revealed comparable results; however one test of word fluency was no longer significant. Individually, the majority exhibited normal or nearly normal language ability and only a few reported subjective changes in language or ability to communicate. This study shows that patients who have been diagnosed with LGG generally show mild or no language deficits on either objective or subjective assessment.},
	journal      = {Journal of Neuro-Oncology},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Longoni, Francesca and Jakola, Asgeir Store and Tisell, Magnus and Thordstein, Magnus and Hartelius, Lena},
	year         = {2018},
	volume       = {137},
	number       = {1},
	pages        = {93–102},
}

@article{Antonsson-Malin2018-265213,
	title        = {Writing fluency in patients with low-grade glioma before and after surgery
},
	abstract     = {© 2018 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. Background: Low-grade glioma (LGG) is a type of brain tumour often situated in or near areas involved in language, sensory or motor functions. Depending on localization and tumour characteristics, language or cognitive impairments due to tumour growth and/or surgical resection are obvious risks. One task that may be at risk is writing, both because it requires intact language and memory function and because it is a very complex and cognitively demanding task. The most commonly reported language deficit in LGG patients is oral lexical-retrieval difficulties, and poor lexical retrieval would be expected to affect writing fluency. Aims: To explore whether writing fluency is affected in LGG patients before and after surgery and whether it is related to performance on tasks of oral lexical retrieval. Methods  &  Procedures: Twenty consecutive patients with presumed LGG wrote a narrative and performed a copy task before undergoing surgery and at 3-month follow-up using keystroke-logging software. The same tasks were performed by a reference group (N = 31). The patients were also tested using the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and word-fluency tests before and after surgery. Writing fluency was compared between the patients and the reference group, and between the patients before and after surgery. Relationships between performance on tests of oral lexical retrieval and writing fluency were investigated both before and after surgery. Outcome  &  Results: Different aspects of writing fluency were affected in the LGG patients both before and after surgery. However, when controlling for the effect of typing speed, the LGG group differed significantly from the reference group only in the proportion of pauses within words. After surgery, a significant decline was seen in production rate and typing speed in the narrative task, and a significant increase was seen in pauses before words. Strong positive relationships were found between oral lexical retrieval and writing fluency both before and after surgery. Conclusions  &  Implications: Although aspects of writing fluency were affected both before and after surgery, the results indicate that typing speed is an important factor behind the pre-surgery differences. However, the decline in overall productivity and the increase in pauses before words after surgery could be related to a lexical deficit. This is supported by the finding that oral lexical-retrieval scores were strongly correlated with writing fluency. However, further exploration is needed to identify the language and cognitive abilities affecting writing processes in LGG patients.},
	journal      = {International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Johansson, Charlotte and Hartelius, Lena and Henriksson, Ingrid and Longoni, Francesca and Wengelin, Åsa},
	year         = {2018},
	volume       = {53},
	number       = {3},
	pages        = {592--604},
}

@article{Antonsson-Malin2018-261877,
	title        = {Post-surgical effects on language in patients with presumed low-grade glioma},
	abstract     = {Objectives: Low-grade glioma (LGG) is a slow-growing brain tumour often situated in or near areas involved in language and/or cognitive functions. Thus, language impairments due to tumour growth or surgical resection are obvious risks. We aimed to investigate language outcome following surgery in patients with presumed LGG, using a comprehensive and sensitive language assessment.
Materials and methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients with presumed LGG were assessed preoperative, early post-operative, and 3 months post-operative using sensitive tests including lexical retrieval, language comprehension and high-level language. The patients’ preoperative language ability was compared with a reference group, but also with performance at post-operative controls. Further, the association between tumour location and language performance pre-and post-operatively was explored. 
Results: Before surgery, the patients with presumed LGG performed worse on tests of
lexical retrieval when compared to a reference group (BNT: LGG-group median 52, Reference-group
median 54, P = .002; Animals: LGG-group mean 21.0, Reference-group mean 25, P = 001; Verbs: LGG-group mean 17.3, Reference-group mean 21.4, P = .001). At early post-operative assessment, we observed a decline in all language tests, whereas at 3 months there was only a decline on a single test of lexical retrieval (Animals: preoperative. median 20, post-op median 14, P = .001). The highest proportion of language impairment was found in the group with a tumour in language-eloquent
areas at all time-points.
Conclusions: Although many patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere deteriorated in their language function directly after surgery, their prognosis for recovery was good.},
	journal      = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Jakola, Asgeir Store and Longoni, Francesca and Carstam, Louise and Hartelius, Lena and Thordstein, Magnus and Tisell, Magnus},
	year         = {2018},
	volume       = {137},
	number       = {5},
	pages        = {469--480},
}

@inProceedings{Antonsson-Malin2017-261791,
	title        = {Narrative writing in patients with low-grade glioma 
- using keystroke logging to investigate differences in the writing process before and after tumour resection
},
	abstract     = {The aim of this study was to investigate the writing process, using a keystroke logging program, in narratives written by patients with LGG and to compare the patients’ writing processes and products three months after tumour resection with their  pre-operative performance. Twenty consecutive patients scheduled for tumour resection at Sahlgrenska University Hospital wrote to a picture-elicited narrative before and at three months follow-up using the keystroke logging program, ScriptLog (Frid, J., Johansson, V., Johansson, R., Wengelin, Å., & Johansson, M., 2014).  After surgery there was a significant decline in production rate, i.e. words produced per minute. An analysis of pause distribution in different micro contexts revealed a significant increase of pauses before initiating the typing of a word. The decline in production rate suggests an increase in cognitive effort in narrative writing for patients who have undergone surgical treatment for LGG. The analysis of pause distribution indicates lexical retrieval difficulties. Investigation of the writing process can give information about subtle changes in language and cognitive processing for patients undergoing tumour resection.   },
	booktitle    = {Meaningful outcomes Nordic Aphasia Conference. Copenhagen, 15 -17 June 2017  },
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Johansson, Charlotte and Longoni, Francesca and Wengelin, Åsa and Henriksson, Ingrid and Hartelius, Lena},
	year         = {2017},
}

@book{Antonsson-Malin2017-260914,
	title        = {Language ability in patients with low-grade glioma - detecting signs of subtle dysfunction},
	abstract     = {Background: Low-grade glioma (LGG) is a slow-growing brain tumour often situated in or near areas involved in language and/or cognitive functions. Consequently, there is a risk that patients develop language impairments due to tumour growth or surgical resection. 
Purposes: The main aim of this thesis was to investigate language ability in patients with LGG in relation to surgical treatment. Language ability was investigated using various sensitive methods such as a test of high-level language. To acquire norms for the test used to investigate high-level language, normative values were obtained in a methodological study (Study I).
Methods: In Study I, 100 adults were assessed using a Swedish test of high-level language (BeSS) and a test of verbal working memory. Relationships between these tests and demographic variables were investigated. In Study II, the language ability of 23 newly diagnosed LGG patients was assessed and compared with that of a reference group. The patients were also asked about self-perceived changes in language. In Study III, the language ability of 32 LGG patients was assessed before surgery, early after surgery and at three-months follow-up. The patients’ language ability was compared across these assessment points and with a reference group. Finally, in Study IV, 20 LGG patients wrote a short narrative before and after surgery. The aim was to explore whether the lexical-retrieval difficulties previously seen in oral language could be seen in writing as well. Keystroke logging was used to explore writing fluency and word-level pauses. Here, too, comparisons were made between the assessment points and with a reference group. 
Results and conclusions: Study I showed that demographic variables had a limited impact on performance on the BeSS whereas verbal working memory influenced performance. Hence verbal working memory was found to influence performance on a test of high-level language. In Study II, the LGG group performed worse than the reference group on tests of lexical retrieval. However, the majority of the newly diagnosed patients with presumed LGG had normal or nearly normal language ability prior to surgery. Only a few patients reported a change in their language ability. In Study III, most patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere manifested language impairment shortly after surgery, but the majority of them had returned to their pre-operative level of performance three months after surgery. Language impairment in patients with a tumour in the right hemisphere was rare at all assessment points. In Study IV, LGG patients had a higher proportion of pauses within words before surgery than the reference group did. After surgery, the patients’ production rate decreased and the proportion of pauses before words increased. Measures of lexical retrieval showed moderate to strong relationships with writing fluency both before and after surgery. The higher frequency of word-level pauses could indicate a lexical deficit. Overall, lexical-retrieval deficits were the most common type of impairment found both before and after surgery in patients with presumed LGG.},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin},
	year         = {2017},
	publisher    = {Göteborgs universitet},
	address      = {Göteborg },
	ISBN         = {978-91-629-0312-1},
}

@article{Forsgren-Emma2013-165897,
	title        = {Training conversation partners of persons with communication disorders related to Parkinsons disease - a protocol and a pilot study},
	abstract     = {This paper reports on the adaptation of a training programme for conversation partners of persons with Parkinson's disease, and a protocol for assessment of possible changes in conversational interaction as a result of intervention. We present data from an explorative multiple case study with three individuals with Parkinson's disease and their spouses. Repeated analysis of natural conversational interaction and measures of the participants’ perception of communication as well as measures of different cognitive abilities were obtained. The results show that the communication in all three dyads was affected by both speech and language problems and that the conversation training model and the assessment protocol may work well after minor adjustments. Influence of different aspects of cognition on communication is discussed.


},
	journal      = {Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology},
	author       = {Forsgren, Emma and Antonsson, Malin and Saldert, Charlotta},
	year         = {2013},
	volume       = {38},
	number       = {2},
	pages        = {82--90},
}

@article{Antonsson-Malin2016-242360,
	title        = {High-level language ability in healthy individuals and its relationship with verbal working memory},
	abstract     = {The aims of the study were to investigate healthy subjects' performance on a clinical test of high-level language (HLL) and how it is related to demographic characteristics and verbal working memory (VWM). One hundred healthy subjects (20-79 years old) were assessed with the Swedish BeSS test (Laakso, Brunnegard, Hartelius, & Ahlsen, 2000) and two digit span tasks. Relationships between the demographic variables, VWM and BeSS were investigated both with bivariate correlations and multiple regression analysis. The results present the norms for BeSS. The correlations and multiple regression analysis show that demographic variables had limited influence on test performance. Measures of VWM were moderately related to total BeSS score and weakly to moderately correlated with five of the seven subtests. To conclude, education has an influence on the test as a whole but measures of VWM stood out as the most robust predictor of HLL.},
	journal      = {Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Longoni, Francesca and Einald, Christina and Hallberg, Lina and Kurt, Gabriella and Larsson, Kajsa and Nilsson, Tina and Hartelius, Lena},
	year         = {2016},
	volume       = {30},
	number       = {12},
	pages        = {944--958},
}

@inProceedings{Eriksson-Karin2011-166667,
	title        = {Communicative Intervention in Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders: Intervention With Focus on the Conversation Partner},
	booktitle    = {3rd Nordic Aphasia Conference},
	author       = {Eriksson, Karin and Antonsson, Malin and Forsgren, Emma and Hartelius, Lena and Saldert, Charlotta},
	year         = {2011},
	volume       = {2011},
}

@article{Antonsson-Malin2021-301490,
	title        = {Using a Discourse Task to Explore Semantic Ability in Persons With Cognitive Impairment.},
	abstract     = {This paper uses a discourse task to explore aspects of semantic production in persons with various degree of cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The purpose of the study was to test if an in-depth semantic analysis of a cognitive-linguistic challenging discourse task could differentiate persons with a cognitive decline from those with a stable cognitive impairment. Both quantitative measures of semantic ability, using tests of oral lexical retrieval, and qualitative analysis of a narrative were used to detect semantic difficulties. Besides group comparisons a classification experiment was performed to investigate if the discourse features could be used to improve classification of the participants who had a stable cognitive impairment from those who had cognitively declined. In sum, both types of assessment methods captured difficulties between the groups, but tests of oral lexical retrieval most successfully differentiated between the cognitively stable and the cognitively declined group. Discourse features improved classification accuracy and the best combination of features discriminated between participants with a stable cognitive impairment and those who had cognitively declined with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93.},
	journal      = {Frontiers in aging neuroscience},
	author       = {Antonsson, Malin and Lundholm Fors, Kristina and Eckerström, Marie and Kokkinakis, Dimitrios},
	year         = {2021},
	volume       = {12},
}

@article{Johansson-Malmeling-Charlotte2022-313696,
	title        = {Using a digital spelling aid to improve writing in persons with post-stroke aphasia: An intervention study},
	abstract     = {Background: Intervention studies aimed to improve the written production of single words by persons with aphasia have yielded promising results and there is growing interest in interventions targeting text writing. The development of technical writing aids offers opportunities for persons with aphasia, and studies have shown that using them can have a positive impact on written output. Aims: The aim was to investigate what impact training to use a computerised spell checker had on text writing in persons with aphasia. Methods & Procedures: The study had a multiple-baseline single-case experimental design replicated across six male Swedish participants with mild-to-moderate post-stroke aphasia. The participants received training twice a week during 8 weeks, learning how to use the spell checker. At baseline and before every session, the participants wrote two texts which were logged in a keystroke-logging tool. Dependent variables were continuously measured in the texts, and the participants performed tests of language function and answered questionnaires on reading and writing habits and health-related quality of life before and after the intervention. The participants were also interviewed about how they had experienced the training. The results were evaluated on individual and group level. Results: The study showed that systematic individual training involving a spell checker was experienced as positive by the participants and that they all described their writing ability in more positive terms after the intervention. Evaluation showed statistically significant improvements on group level for the dependent variables of spelling accuracy, rated syntax, writing speed and proportion of unedited text during text writing when using the spell checker. The intervention also had a generalising effect on writing speed and editing during text writing without the spell checker and on spelling accuracy in a dictation test. The participants who had the greatest spelling problems were the ones who showed the most progress, but participants with only minor writing difficulties at baseline also improved. Conclusions & Implications: The study shows that a digital spelling aid constitutes effective support for people with aphasia and may also affect levels other than spelling. The training had a generalising positive effect on text writing and spelling in a test. Although writing difficulties is a persisting symptom in aphasia, it can be supported and improved through use of digital spelling aids. Hence, treatment of writing ability should always be included in the rehabilitation of people with aphasia. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: What is already known on this subject Use of a technical writing aid can have a positive impact on the written output of persons with aphasia. Using a digital spell checker may improve spelling as well as other levels of writing, but it has not been investigated using a keystroke-logging tool in combination with language-test scores and results from questionnaires. What this paper adds to existing knowledge Through analyses on both individual and group level, this study shows that a digital spelling aid constitutes effective support for people with aphasia and also affects levels other than spelling. The training had a generalising positive effect on text writing and spelling in a test. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? Digital spelling support, which is a relatively simple and inexpensive technology, can support and improve text writing in persons with post-stroke aphasia.},
	journal      = {International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders},
	author       = {Johansson-Malmeling, Charlotte  and Antonsson, Malin and Wengelin, Åsa and Henriksson, Ingrid},
	year         = {2022},
	volume       = {57},
	number       = {2},
	pages        = {303--323},
}

@article{Åke-Sabina2022-316630,
	title        = {Experiences of language and communication after brain-tumour treatment: A long-term follow-up after glioma surgery.},
	abstract     = {The purpose of this study was to explore how persons having received various treatments for glioma, a type of brain tumour, experience their language, speech, and communication in everyday life. Twelve persons with low-grade glioma and one with high-grade glioma who had undergone tumour resection in 2014-2016 in different tumour locations were interviewed using a semi-structured protocol. The video-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis, which revealed three manifest categories, nine sub-categories and one latent theme. Participants experienced changed communication that affected word finding, motor speech and comprehension. They also expressed how communication required a greater effort; time and context were important factors and participants felt frustrated with their communication. Further, they were dealing with changes and used multiple strategies to manage communication. For most participants it did not affect their everyday life, but it was not like before. In addition, participants adapted their way of living to manage illness-related problems. Uncertainty was a latent theme which emanated from the participants' illness experience, reflecting how living with a slow-growing brain tumour affects life-decisions and views of perceived symptoms. Discussion of how results can be interpreted in relation to previous research and health care are included.},
	journal      = {Neuropsychological rehabilitation},
	author       = {Åke, Sabina and Hartelius, Lena and Jakola, Asgeir Store and Antonsson, Malin},
	year         = {2022},
	pages        = {1--37},
}